Change is Good

dandelion

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Change can be scary as heck…but it’s necessary for growth.  Years ago, I read the book Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway and what I remember, twenty years later, is that when you push yourself and tackle something new that it is only terrifying for a short time.  Once you get on the other side of it, you usually look back and think that it wasn’t that big of a deal and you were worried for no reason.  In fact, you may even do that very thing AGAIN and each time it becomes easier and easier.

There are also times when you try something new and decide that it is something that you don’t want to do again and that’s OK too.  The fact that you tried still goes a long way in expanding your life.  This happened to me with motorcycle riding.  I wanted to learn to ride, took a class, passed my test, bought a motorcycle and realized that motorcycle riding was NOT for me.  I could look at it as a big waste of time, energy and money but in the end, I appreciate the experience and learned some things about myself that I didn’t know before.

man riding boxer motorcycle on road

Photo by Pete Johnson on Pexels.com

Whether it’s personal or professional change, I encourage you to give it a try and push yourself a little each week to be bigger and better than the week before.  I thought I’d share this article from Daily OM about making change easier.

10 Steps to Making Change Easier

BY MADISYN TAYLOR

Change doesn’t have to be hard, here are 10 steps to help make it easier.

 

1. Begin by making small changes or break up large-scale changes into more manageable increments. This can make you feel better about handling the changes you are about to make while making you more comfortable with change in general.

2. Mentally link changes to established daily rituals. This can make changes like taking on a new habit, starting a new job, or adapting to a new home happen much more smoothly. For example, if you want to begin meditating at home, try weaving it into your morning routine.

3. Going with the flow can help you accept change instead of resisting it. If you stay flexible, you will be able to ride out change without too much turbulence.

4. When a change feels most stressful, relief can often be found in finding the good that it brings. An illness, a financial loss, or a broken relationship can seem like the end of the world, yet they also can be blessings in disguise.

5. Remember that all change involves a degree of learning. If you find change particularly stressful, try to keep in mind that after this period of transformation has passed, you will be a wiser person for it.

6. Remember that upheaval and confusion are often natural parts of change. While we can anticipate certain elements that a change might bring, it is impossible to know everything that will happen in advance. Be prepared for unexpected surprises, and the winds of change won’t easily knock you over.

7. Don’t feel like you have to cope with changing circumstances or the stress of making a change on your own. Talk about what’s going on for you with a friend or write about it in a journal. Sharing your feelings can give you a sense of relief while helping you find the strength to carry on.

8. Give yourself time to accept any changes that you face. And as change happens, recognize that you may need time to adjust to your new situation. Allow yourself a period of time to reconcile your feelings. This can make big changes feel less extreme.

9. No matter how large or difficult a change is, you will eventually adapt to these new circumstances. Remember that regardless of how great the change, all the new that it brings will eventually weave itself into the right places in your life.

10. If you’re trying to change a pattern of behavior or navigate your way through a life change, don’t assume that it has to be easy. Wanting to cry or being moody during a period of change is natural. Then again, don’t assume that making a change needs to be hard. Sometimes, changes are meant to be that easy.

 

 

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